Tag Archive: ownership

100 Miles

Titus Norwood and myself


Let me start by telling a story. I have never been a runner. Pushing myself to do anything physical in my teenage years was like asking me to pull weeds – just something I was not drawn to by any means. I had no desire to be physically fit, but I still wanted to look decent. I joined track and gymnastics in high school, hoping this would spawn a “new” me. I took the lazy way out and did not give my best effort. As a result, I broke both of my ankles and it set me back even more. Now I could resort back to my Subway and pizza-eating habits I so craved. In college, I tried out for cheerleading and a girl fell directly on my neck, knocking me to the floor. I could barely walk for a week after that and I gave up on try-outs. Throughout this journey, my only “WHY” was that I was trying to look good, not feel good. I was trying to keep up with others as opposed to set goals for myself. All the wrong reasons helped me to stay in the wrong place. Eventually, I had two babies after graduating college and fell backwards even more down the slippery slope. I knew that I was going to be forced to look at why I was doing what I was doing, although I really did not want to. To preface all of this, how was I going to try this when I could barely even keep up with my two kids at such a young age. What I learned is that one step at a time is all I need to see at the moment. Small goals, small steps would eventually lead to consistency. I would get used to this and start liking the results, or so I told myself. So, round and round and round the track I would go, very slowly. I was not worried about those folks that ran faster than me or the kids at the track that could run up and down the bleachers and not break a sweat. I decided one day that I would set a goal for myself, a distance goal. Starting at 165 pounds (baby weight), it was very difficult. For a month, I could barely get around the track 4 times. Then by the second month, I was doing additional exercises with the 4 laps. By the third month, I was running more than walking and doing additional exercises. By the fourth month, I was doing two miles and additional exercises. By the fifth month, I was running 3-4 miles and started to venture away from the track and into running the great outdoors. All the while I was focused on distance. When I stepped on the weight scale, I watched the numbers slowly fall and even recorded it. One day, after about 5 months, I reached a goal weight that I had not seen in a long time. It was because I had shifted my FOCUS, my WHY. My WHY morphed from wanting to “keep up with the Jones’ ” to “I want to eat clean and instill a life change for myself and my family.” As a result, I was able to run 5 miles without stopping and consistently lost weight until I reached my goal weight. I even promised myself that I would be sure and run a 5k this year. Everything shifted when I spoke to myself in terms of goals and how they would impact me. I had set my sights on what I really wanted to do and weight loss became a by-product of that. It was when I shifted my focus from what I wanted to unearthing my WHY is when I started meeting my goals, and this transformation happened. I am now at the point that when I go out for a run, I am exercising mental fitness as a way of allowing me “think time” and clarity to what I am doing in all aspects of my life. While my WHY may shift in this way, I am grateful for discovering this so early on so that I could build and grow my WHY into other WHY’s. This is true because before I realized what I was doing, I ran over 100 miles in 5 months and found a partner along the way. This journey into physical fitness led me on a journal into mental fitness and I was able to run farther and exercise mental fitness at the same time.

Behavior, Failing Forward, COVA, Growth Mindset

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Disrupting Education

“What is disruptive? Moving from consumption to creation….this is where the magic happens. When students create and tackle real things, they get engaged. Kids are hungry to create. They are looking for new ways to do it….stay up all night to write songs. They need access and the environment. We need to build more tools and let go of constraints to let them create.”There is a lot of fear in doing something new. Involve them in the process. Pair their talents to the talents of their teachers – using their expertise.

Help students solve real-world problems….match resources to problems that exist in their neighborhoods.
Kids are hackers now…they can build websites! Pair those skills to real-world problems. Ask a crowd what’s wrong? They will tell you.

Be ready to adapt. Be ready for disruption. Build that shared experience with students.
Amazing possibilities when you work with students to solve real-world problems, try something new, experiment wherever you’re at. Use crowds of individuals to solve problems.
Take a step forward. Don’t live by someone else’s vision for how the system is supposed to work. Challenge the system and try new things and we will all learn together as part of that experience.

Thib Talks, Disruptive Innovation, COVA

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Do you live in an Innovation Culture?

Innovation Culture

Image from Metabiz.com


Innovation Culture

“The innovation immune system is how an organisation deals with new ideas and can include strategies that kill innovation.” – Graham Brown Martin

When you are in the position to implement change, are you working with an infected culture of innovation? When disruptive innovations are first introduced, they can easily be considered a “disease.” How can you influence others and attract others that believe like you do? Consider these questions and others that can impact your ability to be an education change catalyst. Take a quick gander into the ideas and thinking of Graham Brown-Martin as he discusses an aspect of business that nobody really sees until AFTER they are infected.

 

Professional Learning, Thib Talks, Pedagogy, Disruptive Innovation, Growth Mindset

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The Golden Circle “Why”

 

The Power of WHY
Let me tell you my story. In January 2015, I had my second child, Micah. I had gained almost 50lbs. I decided that it was time to start running to lose some weight. After many miles of running and my focus on the weight loss, the pounds just did come off. Day after day, I stepped on the weight scale and nothing happened. I couldn’t figure out why? I was left with the question of “why?” Why am I running? Why am I trying to lose weight. I realized it was time to find my “why.” I started to focus on distance, endurance, and strength. I found that running with a goal of distance and endurance should be my focal point, not the day to day weight loss regiment. I decided I was going to run a 5k this year! Before I knew it, people started asking me, “Have you lost weight?” Weight loss became a bi-product of my new goal, my new “why.” How transformative!! I encourage you to spend the next 18 minutes to watch Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle “Why.”  It could challenge your thinking in many ways where you just might be inspired to do something more than you thought you could.

Read this article to discover why failure is a great way to turn a challenge into an opportunity!
Sinek’s- Art Before Science
https://www.arts.gov/art-works/2016/art-failure

Thib Talks, Behavior, Failing Forward, COVA

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3 Rules to Spark Learning


“Curiosity comes first, not the other way around.”

Cultivate curiosity

Questions and curiosity are like magnets that draw us to our teachers.
If we place technologies before inquiry, we could be robbing ourselves of our greatest tools as teachers- our students’ questions.
Embrace the mess of learning
Flipped learning should not be the focus – it’s the same dehumanizing chatter wrapped up in fancy clothing.
Confuse/perplex students through questions to tailor robust and informed methods of blended instruction.
Life threatening situation: student questions are the seeds for real learning, not scripted curriculum.
No more disseminators of content; cultivators of curiosity of inquiry, meaning and spark learning!
Practice reflection
Allow student questions to cultivate curiosity, embrace the mess of learning, and reflect on what was impactful and relevant.
3 Rules to Spark Learning
Curiosity comes first, not the other way around
Embrace the mess.
Practice reflection – reflection deserves our care and revision as if one day we will save lives.

Student-Centered Learning, Thib Talks, Behavior

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