Tag Archive: choice

Passion or Pity?

From the time I was a youth, I believed that there was a special approach, or prescriptive formula, or only one way to do things. I believed that the right way was always going to be more difficult because it took energy, time, blood, sweat, and maybe even tears. For so many years, I believed I never had what it took to do something the “right” way as perceived by others. But, one day, I asked myself, what really is the right way anyway?  The answer is, there really is no right way to do anything unless it is something that follows a script. The right way goes back to what you believe and why you believe the way you do. I used to think that my own energy level would help me sort of “pass” through the more difficult times when I felt nervous or uninspired. However, I learned that there is a very distinct difference between energy and charisma. Energy is motivating but charisma actually inspires (Sinek, 2009). I am in the process of finding the balance between both characteristics. When working with my digital learning and leading students, energy motivates them in the first course or two, but my charisma will hopefully inspire them to build their own meaningful connections and map their learning journey throughout the program. When it comes down to it, I might be motivated to come to work for a paycheck and therefore, I have to allow energy depart from my body but that is not the same thing. What inspires me to go to work is the ability to help and inspire others to be change agents and discover learning in new ways that is ultimately for themselves. I have learned that learning is an emotional process and must appeal to the heart. The head won’t go where the heart hasn’t been (Harapnuik, 2015). For this reason, I encourage students to find their why that will set the stage for what they are truly passionate about. Passion cannot be bought, measured, or obtained, it must be something that occurs within our heart. This leads me to Angela Duckworth’s video on GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, as she describes the very core of where humans develop passion for life and its circumstances.

 

Thib Talks, Behavior, Growth Mindset

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Disrupting Education

“What is disruptive? Moving from consumption to creation….this is where the magic happens. When students create and tackle real things, they get engaged. Kids are hungry to create. They are looking for new ways to do it….stay up all night to write songs. They need access and the environment. We need to build more tools and let go of constraints to let them create.”There is a lot of fear in doing something new. Involve them in the process. Pair their talents to the talents of their teachers – using their expertise.

Help students solve real-world problems….match resources to problems that exist in their neighborhoods.
Kids are hackers now…they can build websites! Pair those skills to real-world problems. Ask a crowd what’s wrong? They will tell you.

Be ready to adapt. Be ready for disruption. Build that shared experience with students.
Amazing possibilities when you work with students to solve real-world problems, try something new, experiment wherever you’re at. Use crowds of individuals to solve problems.
Take a step forward. Don’t live by someone else’s vision for how the system is supposed to work. Challenge the system and try new things and we will all learn together as part of that experience.

Thib Talks, Disruptive Innovation, COVA

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3 Rules to Spark Learning


“Curiosity comes first, not the other way around.”

Cultivate curiosity

Questions and curiosity are like magnets that draw us to our teachers.
If we place technologies before inquiry, we could be robbing ourselves of our greatest tools as teachers- our students’ questions.
Embrace the mess of learning
Flipped learning should not be the focus – it’s the same dehumanizing chatter wrapped up in fancy clothing.
Confuse/perplex students through questions to tailor robust and informed methods of blended instruction.
Life threatening situation: student questions are the seeds for real learning, not scripted curriculum.
No more disseminators of content; cultivators of curiosity of inquiry, meaning and spark learning!
Practice reflection
Allow student questions to cultivate curiosity, embrace the mess of learning, and reflect on what was impactful and relevant.
3 Rules to Spark Learning
Curiosity comes first, not the other way around
Embrace the mess.
Practice reflection – reflection deserves our care and revision as if one day we will save lives.

Student-Centered Learning, Thib Talks, Behavior

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