Student-Centered Learning

COVA

 

 

We have written Choice, Ownership, and Voice Through Authentic Learning Opportunities, which we will be referring to as the COVA eBook, to help you to create significant learning environments (CSLE) that will enable you to give your learners choice, ownership, and voice through authentic (COVA) learning opportunities. The COVA eBook is for you and in order to serve you more effectively, we are seeking your input. We need to know what is working, what we need to improve or change, and what we may need to take away or add. Our goal is to take your input and revise the COVA eBook by the summer/fall of 2018 when we plan to release a revised version of the eBook that can help you even more.

I read many books so before I commit to reading a book I like to examine a book’s table of contents, introductory chapters, and some sort of summary of the book. Therefore, to help you decide whether you wish to download the full copy of the COVA eBook we are offering you a PDF that includes the Cover, Table of Contents and first 3 chapters of the book so that you can get a sense of whether or not this book will be useful to you. The first chapter provides a context of how the COVA eBook came about; chapter two provides a context for building on the positive and operational definitions; and the third chapter provides a summary of the remainder of the book and points to the key ideas of how to make CSLE+COVA work for you, which is detailed in the remainder of the book. Download COVA eBook Preview

To download a copy of the full eBook we are simply asking you to provide your name and email address so that we can point you to the location where you can provide your input, to inform you on the progress of the COVA eBook revisions, and to point you to ongoing developments in the COVA approach. We respect your privacy and are excited to have you review our ideas and work so we will not share or sell your name or email address to anyone. You can also unsubscribe from the COVA eBook list at any time.

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COVA — is a learner centered active learning approach that gives the learner choice (C), ownership (O), and voice (V) through authentic (A) learning opportunities.

While the acronym COVA is somewhat authentic, the elements of the COVA approach to learning which include choice, ownership, and voice through authentic activities or assignments are based on well-established and widely accepted active learning principles. Similarly, the elements of Creating Significant Learning Environments (CSLE) are not new and neither is the idea of looking at learning from a holistic or broader learning environment perspective. So, when the COVA approach is combined with CSLE, you get a significant learning environment which takes into account all the key elements essential to effective active learning. Additionally, the learner has the opportunity to choose and take ownership of their own authentic learning experiences. All the variables are in place to help your learner make the meaningful connections which are so fundamental to learning. When you factor in a genuine digital learning portfolio, which we prefer to call an ePortfolio, you also give your learner the opportunity to find their voice, reflect on their experiences, express their insights, connect, and collaborate with a broader learning community. Research has shown that the assembly of existing or well-established ideas into new combinations is the foundation of most innovative work and knowledge advancement (Wuchty, Jones, & Uzzi, 2007; Duhigg, 2016).

COVA Components

Choice – Learners are given the freedom to choose (C) how they wish to organize, structure and present their learning experiences and evidence of learning. Choice also extends to the authentic project or learning experience. Choice promotes personalized learning (Bolliger & Sheperd, 2010) which includes adapting or developing learning goals and choosing learning tools that support the learning process (Buchem, Tur, & Hölterhof, 2014). It is crucial to acknowledge that the learner’s choice is guided by the context of the learning opportunity and by the instructor who aids the learner in making effective choices.

It is extremely important that this learning process is understood as guided discovery and not confused with pure discovery learning (Bruner, 1961, 1960). The research over the past 40 years confirms guided discovery provides the appropriate freedom to engage in authentic learning opportunities while at the same time providing the necessary guidance, modeling, and direction to lessen the cognitive overload (Mayer, 2004). In addition to instructor guidance, the creation of a significant learning environment will also provide guidance and structure to help direct the learner. The academic literature is rich with examples of choice which can often be referred to as learner agency, autonomy, empowerment, self-efficacy. Choice has a very long history as we can see from Dewey’s (1916) perspective from Democracy and Education:

The essence of the demand for freedom is the need of conditions which will enable an individual to make his own special contribution to a group interest, and to partake of its activities in such ways that social guidance shall be a matter of his own mental attitude and not a mere authoritative dictation of his acts. (p.352)

Ownership – Learners are given control and ownership (O) over the entire learning process including the selection of projects, the ePortfolio process, and all their learning tools. Once again we must reiterate that this ownership process is within the context of instructor guidance. The same benefits of guided discovery discussed above apply to this context as well. Constructivists, like Jonassen (1999), argue that ownership of the problem is key to learning because it increases learner engagement and motivation to seek out solutions. Ownership of learning is also directly tied to agency when learners make choices and “impose those choices on the world” (Buchem et al., 2014, p. 20; Buchem, Attwell, & Torres, 2011). Clark (2001) points to a learner’s own personal agency and ownership of belief systems as one major factor contributing to the willingness and persistence in sharing their learning. These belief systems must be understood prior to sharing their belief systems. Clark (2001) also claimed that media is not solely responsible for learner motivation.

Voice – Learners are given the opportunity to use their own voice (V) to structure their work and ideas and share those insights and knowledge with their colleagues within their organizations. The opportunity to share this new knowledge publicly with people other than the instructors helps the learner to deepen their understanding, demonstrate flexibility of knowledge, find their unique voice, establish a sense of purpose, and develop a greater sense of personal significance (Bass, 2014).

Authentic learning – Learners are given the opportunity to select and engage in authentic (A) learning opportunities that enable them to make a genuine difference in their own learning environments. The selection and engagement in real-world problems that are relevant to the learner furthers their ability to make meaningful connections (Donovan et al., 2000) and provide them with career preparedness not available in more traditional didactic forms of education (Windham, 2007). Research confirms that authenticity is only developed through engagement with these sorts of real-world tasks and that this type of authentic learning can deepen knowledge creation and ultimately help the learner transfer this knowledge beyond the classroom (Driscoll, 2005; Nikitina, 2011). It is also important to recognize that authenticity is not an independent or isolated feature of the learning environment but it is the result of the continual interaction between the learner, the real-world activity, and the learning environment (Barab, Squire, & Dueber, 2000). This is also why we stress that in the COVA model choice, ownership, and voice are realized through authentic learning and without this dynamic and interactive authenticity, there would be no genuine choice, ownership, and voice.

References

Barab, S. A., Squire, K. D., & Dueber, W. (2000). A co-evolutionary model for supporting the emergence of authenticity. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(2), 37-62.

Bass, R. (2014). Social pedagogies in ePortfolio practices: Principles for design and impact. Retrieved from http://c2l.mcnrc.org/pedagogy/ped-analysis/

Bolliger, D. U., & Sheperd, C. E. (2010). Student perceptions of ePortfolio integration in Online courses. Distance Education, 31(3), 295-314.

Bruner, J. S. (1960). The process of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. S. (1961). The act of discovery. Harvard Educational Review, 31(1), 21–32.

Buchem, I., Attwell, G., & Torres, R. (2011). Understanding personal learning environments: Literature review and synthesis through the activity theory lens. Proceedings of the PLE Conference, 1-33. Retrieved from http://journal.webscience.org/658/

Buchem, I., Tur, G., & Hölterhof, T. (2014). Learner control in personal learning environments: cross-cultural study. Journal of Literacy and Technology, 15(2), 14-53. Retrieved from http://www.literacyandtechnology.org/volume-15-number-2-june-2014.html

Clark, R. (2001). Learning from media: Arguments, analysis, and evidence. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.

Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and education: An introduction to philosophy of education. New York, NY: Macmillan.

Donovan, S. M., Bransford, J. D., & Pellegrino, J. W. (2000). How People Learn: Bridging research and practice. Washington D. C.: National Academy Press.

Driscoll, M. P. (2005) Psychology of Learning for Instruction. Toronto, ON: Pearson.

Duhigg, C. (2016). Smarter faster better: The secrets of being productive. New York, NY: Random House.

Jonassen, D. H. (1999). Designing constructivist learning environments. In C. M. Reigeluth, Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (pp. 215-240). New York, NY: Routledge.

Mayer, R. E. (2004). Should there be a three-strikes rule against pure discovery learning? American Psychologist, 59(1), 14–19. http://dx.doi.org.libproxy.lamar.edu/10.1037/0003-066X.59.1.14

Nikitina, L. (2011). Creating an authentic learning environment in the foreign language classroom. International Journal of Instruction, (4)1, 33-36. Retrieved from http://www.e-iji.net/dosyalar/iji_2011_1_3.pdf

Windham, C. (2007). Why today’s students value authentic learning. Educause Learning ELI Paper 9. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI3017.pdf

Wuchty, S., Jones, B. F., & Uzzi, B. (2007). The increasing dominance of teams in production of knowledge. Science, 316(5827), 1036–1039.

Student-Centered Learning, Pedagogy, COVA

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Honors

Dear Honors Students,
Welcome to Lamar University and the REAUD Honor’s College!
My name is Dr. Thibodeaux and I will be helping you as your embark upon a new learning journey at the University. I will be assisting you as a mentor and a resource as you build an ePortfolio that encompasses your academic experience at LU. If you want to learn more about me, please check out my About Me page.
I am also available via Skype, Google Hangouts, Zoom, or Adobe Connect. My email is tilisa.thibodeaux@lamar.edu – just send me an email and your username and we will connect via video conferencing or telephone at your convenience.
My office # is 409.880.2315. You can stop by anytime.
My partner, Dr. Harapnuik, is also available virtually to visit and meet with you if I am unavailable. His email is dharapnuik@lamar.edu in the aforementioned ways. Check out his site here at www.harapnuik.org

Honor’s ePortfolio:

Well, what is it?
There are a couple of amazing opportunities here in the REAUD Honors College that we have designed just for you, the learner. The first one is that you will develop an ePortfolio that will be used to document your learning experience throughout your undergraduate, and graduate years, in college. This ePortfolio is completely YOURS and what you will put into it will be dictated by YOU. This is a completely free service to you from the many website platforms you can choose from.  Examples of platforms are: WordPress, Weebly, Google Sites, Squarespace, etc. Your honor’s professors will also encourage you to add to your ePortfolio and we will provide many in-house and outside examples for you to look at, both internationally and locally.

What do I put in an ePortfolio?
You might be asking yourself, What is an ePortfolio?, read this post and find out the amazing opportunity you have as a learner to build out your ePortfolio.

Excerpt from REAUD Honor’s College Handbook:
Official documentation of activities qualifying for Honors points should be submitted online in the form of an ePortfolio to the REAUD Honors College Office before the last day of the semester in which the points were accrued. Materials on Service, Leadership, and Intellectual/Cultural Activities will be assessed in order to determine the number of points earned.
The personal ePortfolio is an opportunity for the student to express his/her creativity and to reflect on his/her activities in the REAUD Honors College and at Lamar University. Students are encouraged to make connections among their extracurricular activities, coursework, and high impact practices. Finally, the construction of the ePortfolio enables students to increase his/her familiarity with digital technology and the practices of responsible digital citizenship.

While you are building the ePortfolio, I will model a learning approach birthed here at LU that allows you quite a bit of freedom and flexibility in creating the ePortfolio.

Honor’s Points: What are they and how do I log them electronically?
Now that you have been accepted in the prestige Reaud Honor’s College, the program was set up for you have a diversity of experiences. Read the Honor’s College Mission Statement below:

The Reaud Honors College integrates academic excellence, community involvement, and civic leadership.

How We Live Our Mission:
Through regular strategic advisement with our students, we explore, refine, and develop their personal goals and assist them in engaging with realistic opportunities in their academic and professional lives such that they may achieve Reaud Honors College Graduate status and further their educational and professional aspirations beyond Lamar University.
We provide enhanced Honors course offerings in the core curriculum, upper-division degree requirements, and unique interdisciplinary Honors seminars and topics courses.
We support student participation in the high impact educational practices of undergraduate research and creative activity, diversity and global learning, internships and cooperative education, and service learning with personal attention paid to the needs, interests, and aspirations of each individual student.
We encourage and facilitate involvement in the Honors student, University, and local communities through Honors residential life, the Honor Points system and the Honors Student Association.

For this reason, the Honor’s College requires so many points to graduate with Honor’s status. You will document your Honor’s points that you have earned directly in your ePortfolio. This will be used by the department to record your experiences so that you will have a well-rounded, deep, and meaningful learning experience at Lamar. You can link pictures, links to posts, links to external webpages, and any other information you would like to include.

These activities include: Service, Leadership, Cultural/Intellectual, and Honors Activities points.

 

Once created, use this FORM to submit your name and the link to your ePortfolio.

Submit the link to your ePortfolio by using this form. You only need to submit ONCE. As you make changes to your ePorfolio, the link you share will reflect those changes.

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Research, ePortfolios, Collaboration

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COVA + CSLE

Why CSLE+COVA

Why:
We believe that we must inspire and prepare our learners to lead organizational change using technology innovations as a catalyst for enhancing learning.
 
How:
To do this, we create a significant learning environment (CSLE) that gives our learners choice, ownership and voice through authentic (COVA) learning opportunities.
 
What:
We prepare leaders who can lead organizational change and drive innovation in a digitally connected world.

Core Proposition
Choice, ownership, and voice through authentic learning

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Research, ePortfolios, Pedagogy, Failing Forward, COVA, CSLE, Constructivism, Social Constructivism, Growth Mindset, Feedback/Feedforward, Self-Directed Learning

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Focus on the behavior now and the outcome will follow.

Influencer
Grenny, Patterson, Maxfield, McMillan, and Switzler (2013) advocate to focus on changing goals, behaviors, or processes; do not focus on the results. You might be asking yourself….what does this mean? Well, let me share an example. When I was in high school, I threw the discus. I was coached on technique and not on distance. There was a technique called the ‘South African’ which required a 360 degree bodily movement. With that technique, I came up with a rhyme, ‘rip the hip’ and ‘follow through.’ This meant that my hip would come through first as I spun through the technique. My body would follow the move instead of hinder or control it. After focusing on technique and less on distance, one day I threw the farthest distance I had ever thrown! This just reiterates for me that the outcome is a end result of the behavior, goal, or process.

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Behavior

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3 Rules to Spark Learning


“Curiosity comes first, not the other way around.”

Cultivate curiosity

Questions and curiosity are like magnets that draw us to our teachers.
If we place technologies before inquiry, we could be robbing ourselves of our greatest tools as teachers- our students’ questions.
Embrace the mess of learning
Flipped learning should not be the focus – it’s the same dehumanizing chatter wrapped up in fancy clothing.
Confuse/perplex students through questions to tailor robust and informed methods of blended instruction.
Life threatening situation: student questions are the seeds for real learning, not scripted curriculum.
No more disseminators of content; cultivators of curiosity of inquiry, meaning and spark learning!
Practice reflection
Allow student questions to cultivate curiosity, embrace the mess of learning, and reflect on what was impactful and relevant.
3 Rules to Spark Learning
Curiosity comes first, not the other way around
Embrace the mess.
Practice reflection – reflection deserves our care and revision as if one day we will save lives.

Student-Centered Learning, Thib Talks, Behavior

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Do Bullets Kill PD?

Do Bullets Kill Professional Learning?

What is it about the “sit and get” professional development model that we just don’t dare to deviate from? Could it be that we are comfortable doing the same thing over and over again assuming that our instructional delivery is working? So says Einstein’s definition of insanity: “Doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results.” Instead of making an effort to drill and kill, why not make professional learning engaging? If you want to change, be the change you wish to see. Modeling is key to implementing change.
Check out this link from Global Partnership in Education: Five Models of Teacher-Centered Professional Development
Check out this link from the Center for Public Education: Teaching the Teachers Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Research, Pedagogy, Collaboration, Feedback/Feedforward

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Research

If there is something that I am working on that you are interested in co-developing or working on with me, please email me at tilisa.thibodeaux@lamar.edu

Scholarly Publications

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

Thibodeaux, T. N., & Harapnuik, D. K. (2018). Framework for Feedback in the DLL Program. Manuscript in progress.

Thibodeaux, T. N., & Harapnuik, D. K. (2018). Authentic Learning Experiences. Manuscript in progress.

Harapnuik, D. K., & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2018). The COVA learning approach as a threshold concept. Manuscript in progress.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (in press). Perceptions of the influence of learner choice, ownership in learning, and voice in learning and the learning environment. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K, & Cummings, C. D. (2018). Graduate student perceptions of the impact of the COVA learning approach on authentic projects and ePortfolios. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K, & Cummings, C. D. (2017). Factors that contribute to ePortfolio persistence. International Journal of ePortfolio, 7(1), p. 1-12. Retrieved from http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP257.pdf

Nicks, B. E, Martin, G. E. & Thibodeaux, T. N. (in press). Student Perceptions of Enhancing the Internship Experience for Online Principal Preparation Programs. Texas Council of Professors of Educational Leadership: School Leadership Review.

Peer Reviewed Book

*Harapnuik, D. K, Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (in press). Creating significant learning environments through choice, ownership, voice, and authenticity.

Peer Reviewed Book Chapters

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., Cummings, C. D., & Wooten, R. (In press). Learning all the time and everywhere: Moving beyond the hype of the mobile learning quick fix. In Keengwe, J. S. (Eds.). Handbook of research on mobile technology, constructivism, and meaningful learning. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Submitted for Publication.
Expected publication date: December 2017

Harapnuik, D. K., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (2017). Using the COVA learning approach to create active and significant learning environments. In Keengwe, J. S. (Eds.). Handbook of research on digital content, mobile learning, and technology integration models in teacher education. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Submitted for Publication.
Expected publication date: August 2017

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Poda, I. (2017). New Technologies. In Martin, G. E., Danzig, A. B., Wright, W. F., Flanary, R. A. and Orr, M.T. School leader internship: Developing, monitoring, and evaluating your leadership experience (4th Ed.). New York: Routledge, pp. 91-94.
Available for purchase at: https://www.amazon.com/School-Leader-Internship-Developing-Monitoring/dp/1596670096

Popular Articles

Still, M., Cummings, C., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Abernathy, K. (in press). Laptops: The key to improving middle school reading comprehension. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Thomas, A., & Harapnuik, D. K. (2017, November). Communicating success through ePortfolios. [Featured Article]. Texas Computer Education Association TCEA Techedge, 2(2), 13. Retrieved from https://www.tcea.org/TechEdge/2017/04/

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (2017, May). Learners as critical thinkers for the workplace of the future: Introducing the COVA learning approach. Texas Computer Education Association TCEA Techedge, 2(2), 13. Retrieved from http://www.tcea.org/about/publications/ (must have a subscription/log in for TCEA for viewing rights)

Thibodeaux, T. N. & Fong, D. L. (2016, August). Augmented reality: Making learning come to life. [Featured Article]. Texas Computer Education Association TCEA Techedge, 4(3), 18-21. Retrieved from http://www.tcea.org/about/publications/ (must have a subscription/log in for TCEA for viewing rights)

Thibodeaux, T. N. & Roblyer, M. D. (2015, July). Teachers talk: When are BYOD strategies worth the trouble? Pearson Education.
PDF of paper: ThibodeauxRoblyerArticle_v2

Academic Workshops

Harapnuik, D. K. & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2017). Choice, ownership, and voice through authentic learning. Capilano University ePortfolio Workshop, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
PDF of slide deck: COVA-CSLE in DLL – Feb 16 2017

Harapnuik, D. K. & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2017). Modeling ePortfolios: How to use and model an eportfolio in your course/program. Capilano University ePortfolio Workshop, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
PDF of slide deck: Modeling ePortfolios Fe6 2017

Academic Papers Presented

Nicks, R., Martin, G.E., Arterbury, E. & Thibodeaux, T.N. (2017).Online principal program student perceptions and recommendations for improving the principal internship. Paper presented at the International Council for Educational Leadership Preparation Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
PPT of slide deck: NCPEA_2017_San Juan, PR_1

Harapnuik, D. K., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (2017, March). Student perceptions of the impact of the COVA approach on the ePortfolios and authentic projects in the digital learning and leading program. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE), Austin, TX.
Abstract: https://www.academicexperts.org/conf/site/2017/papers/50326/

Martin, G. E., Nicks, R., Arterbury, E., & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2017, April). Recommendations for improving the principal program internship. Lamar University Research Conference, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: School Internship Research Conference _2017

Grants

2017
Submitted, Principal Investigator
Day in the Life of a STEM Environment
Internal Grant – College of Education and Human Development, Mason Gift

2017
Awarded, Principal Investigator
Exploring the Link Between African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and Code Switching in Classroom Settings
Internal Grant – Lamar University Research and Sponsored Programs, Undergraduate Research Grant

2017
Submitted, Principal Investigator
The effects of the COVA learning model intervention using ePortfolios in the undergraduate honors program at Lamar University
Internal Grant – Lamar University Research and Sponsored Programs

2016
Awarded, Principal Investigator
Student perceptions of the impact of the COVA model on their ePortfolios and authentic projects in the Digital Learning and Leading Program,
External Grant – Academic Partnerships

2015
Awarded, Co-Principal Investigator
ePortfolio Persistence, External Grant – Academic Partnerships

Conference Presentations

International

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (2018). Rethinking how to make ePortfolios as a high impact practice. America Colleges and Universities: ePortfolio Forum, Washington D. C.
Slide deck: https://www.aacu.org/AM18/EPForum

Harapnuik, D. K., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (2017, July). Student perceptions of the COVA learning approach. Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL), Portland, OR.
PDF of slide deck: AAEEBL Portland, OR 2017

Nicks, R., Martin, G.E., Arterbury, E. & Thibodeaux, T.N. (2017, July). Online principal program student perceptions and recommendations for improving the principal internship. Paper presented at the International Council for Educational Leadership Preparation Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
PPT of slide deck: NCPEA_2017_San Juan, PR_1

Cummings, C. D., Harapnuik, D. K., & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2016, February). ePortfolio persistence. Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL), Fort Worth, TX.
PDF of slide deck: ePortfolio Persistence AAEEBL TCU – Feb 25

Cummings, C. D., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Harapnuik, D. K. (2016, August). ePortfolio learning. Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL), Boston, MA.
PDF of slide deck: AAEEBL Boston August 2016-ver2

National

Harapnuik, D. K., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (2016, April). Go and show digital learning. Consortium of School Networking (CoSN), Washington D.C.
PDF of slide deck: COSN DC – April 6-2016-Rev 2

State

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (2017, March). The COVA learning  approach: A learner centered experience. Texas Distance Learning Association (TxDLA), Galveston, TX.
PDF of slide deck: COVA-CSLE in DLL – Feb 16 2017

Harapnuik, D. K., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Cummings, C. D. (2017, March). Student perceptions of  the COVA approach. Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education (SITE), Austin, TX.
PDF of slide deck: SITE 2017 COVA

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (2016, March). Going beyond the unimaginable limits in distance education. Texas Distance Learning Association (TxDLA), San Antonio, TX.
PDF of slide deck: TxDLA San Antonio – March 31-Rev 2

Thibodeaux, T. N. & Fong, D. L. (2016, February). Using Aurasma to make book auras that glow. Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA), Austin, TX.
PDF of slide deck: Aurasma Presentation 2

Regional

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2018). ePortfolios and authentic projects in the Digital Learning and Leading program. Dishman School of Nursing. Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Keynote:
Thibodeaux, T. N. & Harapnuik, D. K. (2017). Significant learning environments. Buna Independent School District. Buna, TX.
PDF of slide deck: Buna ISD Presentation

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2017). Audio presentation: Significant learning environments. Sheldon Independent School District. Houston, TX.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., Cummings, C. D. & Malick, S. (2017, May). The COVA Learning Approach. Digital Ticket, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: Ed Research Conference 2017.pdf

Martin, G. E., Nicks, R., Arterbury, E., & Thibodeaux, T. N. (2017, April). Recommendations for improving the principal program internship. Lamar University Research Conference, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: School Internship Research Conference _2017

Cummings, C. D., Thibodeaux, T. N., & Harapnuik, D. K. (2017, April). Factors that contribute to ePortfolio persistence. Lamar University Research Conference, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: TxDLA 2017 COVA & CSLE.pdf

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2016, August). Screencast feedforward, Provost’s Kick Off: Digital Learning. Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Harapnuik, D. K., & Cummings, C. D. (2016, May). Go and show digital learning. Digital Ticket, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: LU Digital Ticket-May 19, 2016-Rev 4 Digital Ticket

2015 and before

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2015, October). Google Up! Powering Up Your Classroom With Google Tools. Region V Mobile Mania, Beaumont, TX.
PDF of slide deck: Google Tools

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2015, October). Aurasma. Region V Mobile Mania, Beaumont, TX 
PDF of slide deck: Aurasma Presentation 2

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2014, October). Edmodo using google tools. Region V Mobile Mania,Beaumont, TX. 

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2014, October). Classroom Dojo, QR codes, and Educreations for the classroom. Region V Mobile Mania, Beaumont, TX.

Thibodeaux, T. N. (2013, October). Introduction to Edmodo. Region V Mobile Mania. Beaumont, TX.

Thibodeaux, T. N., Cunningham, C. J., & Davidson, P. A. (2011, July) Hear my cry: I’m struggling with RtI. International Literacy Association, Orlando, FL. 

Informal Presentations
Curriculum & Instruction: ePortfolio Learning

Scholarly Reviews

Books

Mason, D. D. & Meeuwse, K. (2017, January). Personalized Professional Learning for Educators. [Review of book]. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Journals

Texas Distance Learning Association Journal of Distance Learning Reviewer

Service Leadership

International
International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
 -Conference Committee – Research Proposal Reviewer, 2017-2018
Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL)
-Board – Projects and Initiatives Standing Committee
-Conference Program Committee
-Conference Proposal Reviewer
-SIG Leader – Pedagogy and Practices
Phi Gamma Sigma International Professional Society
Texas Distance Learning Association International Refereed Journal Reviewer

National
Greater Plains Honors Council Award Judge
National Council of Professors of Educational Administration Proposal Reviewer
Society for Information Technology in Education, Technology SIG

State
Texas Distance Learning Association (TxDLA)
-State Scholarship Chair

-Scholarship Committee Member
-Conference Proposal Reviewer
-Leader Awards Committee
-Hall of Fame Committee
Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators Awards Committee

Regional
Sheldon Independent School District, Science Department, Expert Speaker, Houston, TX
Buna Independent School District, Convocation Key Note Speaker, Buna, TX
Deweyville High School Technology Integration Presentation/Aurasma, Deweyville, TX
Bridge City Intermediate Technology Integration, Bridge City, TX

Local
Lamar University Hosted Teacher Recruitment Fair
Region V Mobile Mania

University

Academic Information Technology Committee *elected,
#Office of Undergraduate Research Proposal Review Committee
#Center for Teaching and Learning Enhancement Mentor
#Center for Teaching and Learning Enhancement Mentor Faculty Guest Speaker
#Provost’s Kick-Off Roundtable Speaker
University Honor’s Council Appointment
President’s Task Force on Digital Learning

Provost’s Kick-off Digital Learning
LU Graduation Announcer of the Graduates

Digital Learning Research Committee
Homecoming Faculty Representative
COEHD Homecoming Chair

Lamar Student Education Association Co-Sponsor

Professional Organizations
Association of American Colleges & Universities (AACU)
Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE)
Consortium of School Networking (CoSN)
International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL)
Texas Distance Learning Association  (TxDLA)
Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT)
Learning Forward Leadership
Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA)
International Literacy Association (ILA)
Florida Center for Instructional Technology (FCIT)
Florida Digital Educators (FDE)

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Research, ePortfolios, Pedagogy

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Learning Mindset

Learning Mindset

What is a learning mindset and how do we get there?
Here are some thoughts around learning experiences that show up thematically in my work as a higher education consultant and instructor:
#1  People need a learning environment in which they feel safe to make mistakes,
#2  Challenges and disruptions can be turned into an opportunity to bring about change,
#3  Deep learning occurs through meaningful reflection, dialogue, and collaborative interaction.

Do you have a fixed or a growth mindset?

Notes from the Video

“Don’t just praise students on their learning; tie it back to the learning and progress” (Dweck, 2014).
Talents and abilities are not “fixed” but can be grown and developed. The brain can be developed like a muscle.
Help students find their zest for learning. A fixed environment sets us up to have a fixed mindset.
When deep learning occurs, grades and test scores are a simple by-product.

Student-Centered Learning, Professional Learning, Thib Talks, Growth Mindset

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